Sateh Babi | A touch of Indonesia from A Treasury of Great Recipes

In our ongoing test of tasty recipes from the cookbooks of Vincent Price, here’s a great summer BBQ treat, Sateh Babi (Skewered Pork), from the original Bali Restaurant in Amsterdam.

The BaliThe Bali restaurant in Amsterdam was famed for bring Indonesian cookery to the Netherlands, and this skewered pork recipe comes from that now closed establishment, and makes excellent use of the Javanese soy sauce ketjap benteng (although ketjap manis is a fine substitute). Best served with steamed rice and other rijsttafel (rice tables) dishes.

sateINGREDIENTS
Pork
Java soy sauce
Salt, pepper
Sugar
Cooking oil

METHOD
Cut: 1 pound lean tender pork into small cubes. Marinate the meat in: 1.3 cup Java soy sauce (ketjap benteng or ketjap manis) with 1 teaspoon salt, ¼ teaspoon pepper, and ½ tablespoon sugar for several hours, or overnight. The longer the better.

When ready to cook, thread the meat on short sticks, using about 4 cubes on each stick. Brush with cooking oil and broil 2/12 inches from heat for 20 minutes, turning frequently and basting with cooking oil.

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Pork Cutlets Escorial | Eat like a Spanish king with this classic dish from A Treasury of Great Recipes

PorK Cutlets Escorial | A Treasury of Great RecipesOn one of the sunny days that hit London recently, I got the chance to dine al fresco in the back garden. It was the perfect time to dip into Vincent and Mary Price’s A Treasury of Great Recipes for inspiration as to what to do with a number of pork shoulder medallions – and there I found Pork Cutlets Escorial.

This dish is tremendous, as is the Escorial’, wrote Vincent about the pork cutlet recipe that he got from a chef at the Palace Hotel in Madrid, which is named after Philip II’s ‘gloomy old palace and monastery’ – just the sort of place that would suit our favourite Gothic horror star.

799px-VistaescorialThis dish is incredibly easy to make, and the fusion of olives, cream and Brown sauce was winner. I did, however, leave out the glacéed chestnut (aka Marrons glacés) as they were out of season.

The recipe also calls for Mustard Fruits, which originated in Cremona, Lombardy, Italy and are made from unripe fruit preserved in a syrup that has been combined with mustard oil. As I didn’t have any, I substituted it with some homemade chutney that I had lurking in the back of a cupboard and it worked a treat.

INGREDIENTS
Pork cutlets
Dijon mustard
Salt, pepper
Butter
Flour
Mustard fruits
Dry white wine
Cream brown sauce
Large stuffed olives
Glacéed chestnuts

PORK CUTLETS
1 Rub: 4 pork cutlets with 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard each, and sprinkle with a little salt and some ground pepper.
2 In a skillet heat: 2 tablespoons butter in it sauté the pork cutlets for 5 minutes on each side, or until brown. Reduce heat and cook slowly for 5 minutes. Transfer cutlets to warm dish and keep warm.

PorK Cutlets Escorial | A Treasury of Great Recipes

SAUCE
1 Discard all but 1-tablespoon drippings in pan.
2 Add to pan: 1-tablespoon flour and cook, stirring, for 1 minute.
3 Add: 1 cup dry white wine, bring to rapid boil and boil briskly, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes.
4 Stir in: ½ cup cream, 3 tablespoons brown sauce [I used HP Sauce], 8 large stuffed olives, finely chopped, and 4 glacéed chestnuts.
5 Return pork cutlets to sauce and simmer for 3 minutes.
6 In a small pan heat: 6 tablespoons finely chopped mustard fruits in their syrup.

PRESENTATION
Transfer cutlets to warm serving dish, cover with sauce and top each cutlets with a glacéed chestnut. Drain the chopped mustard fruits and sprinkle on top.

 

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Cooking Price-Wise | Vincent’s Fish Fillets Noord Zee

cooking price wise knife

This guest post comes from
Jenny Hammerton of Silver Screen Suppers

Hello, I’m Vincent Price!’
So begins each episode of Vincent’s Price’s glorious television show, Cooking Price-Wise, which launched on this very day in 1971 on ITV at 11.15pm. Lucky television viewers in Britain were given friendly cooking advice from the Master of Menace himself, in six stupendous instalments.

In a traditional striped butchers apron and jaunty cravat, Vincent presented exotic sounding recipes gleaned from glamorous places outside the British Isles. He guaranteed that these recipes could be made with ingredients that any Brit would be able to buy in their neighbourhood store or supermarket. At the time this series was produced, that was saying something…

In the early 1970s many British cooks were strictly ‘meat and two veg’ types, but Vincent aimed to educate and inspire them to expand their horizons. He proclaimed that: ‘in this series of programmes, I hope to take you around the world, using your cooker instead of a jet-plane.’ He wanted to encourage the British cook to try something a little bit different, and would demonstrate some favourite dishes that he and his wife Mary had collected ‘on our travels, here and there.’ Vincent reassured his viewers that, ‘no matter how outlandish some dishes sound to you, or how out of the way the places they come from, they really are quite simple.’

Cooking Price-Wise (1971)

Before the cooking began in the very first episode, Vincent gave viewers a potted history of an obscure little vegetable that was discovered in Peru. He managed to riff about this magical food for a good few minutes without actually revealing its name. At the end of his history lesson he pronounced with great relish: ‘and this, ladies and gentleman, is it!’ Bringing into view a large, mucky example of this very famous ingredient, he pronounced its name in the way only Vincent Price could: ‘the po-ta-to.’ There then followed a demonstration on how to make three recipes using the humble spud. Manhattan Vichyssoise, Pommes de Terre Savoyarde and Fish Fillets Noord Zee.

Vincent cooks in a kitchen set that is a dream come true for those who love 1970s cookware. He uses some beautiful enamel saucepans, white with an orange and yellow design. Scattered around the work surfaces are groovy orange and yellow storage canisters. He grinds salt and pepper from lovely red and yellow wooden grinders, so familiar to those of us who grew up in the 1970s. Inspired by Vincent I treated myself to some decorated enamel saucepans a couple of years ago, and I always think of his cooking show when I use them.

My Saucepan

Vincent was very keen on kitchen contraptions. On the first show he uses an electrical device that produces a ‘whole box’ of perfectly sliced potatoes. He then shows how to use a blender to take some of the work out of making Manhattan Vichyssoise. He jokes that you must remember to put the lid on the blender ‘otherwise you will have a brand new paint job in your kitchen’. He has a lovely, friendly, chatty style as he cooks. Well aware that not every home cook in the 1970s would have a blender, he advises that using a sieve would be just as good, but harder work. Vincent’s obvious confidence in the kitchen would have really encouraged the tentative cook to try out his recipes, I am sure. He really does make the food he is preparing sound easy to make, and delicious to eat.

Cooking Price Wise_Ad_TVT_cropAll of the recipes Vincent demonstrates in the cookery show are included in the book that accompanied the series. Cooking Price-Wise is now an extremely rare and highly collectable cookbook, which was originally priced at just 30p. If you have a spare £1,000 knocking around in your bank account, you could buy one of the only 2 copies available on Amazon. Currently priced at £999.11, you’ll have 89p to play with assuming they throw in free postage. I would never, ever sell my much-treasured copy of this book. It is very bashed about, as I use it often, and it contains my notes on the recipes I have made from its lovely selection. The first time I made Fish Fillets Noord Zee in 2011 for example, my verdict was simple.  Scribbled in turquoise ink, it just says ‘Awesome!’.

Fish Fillets Noord Zee is one of the recipes Vincent demonstrates in the first episode of Cooking Price-Wise. This is a really fun dish to make as it involves putting mashed potato into a piping bag in order to make a series of ‘dykes’ which represent the sea walls in Holland. It’s a pretty bonkers recipe, but is definitely a crowd pleaser if you have guests. Sometimes I feel that making an extravagant dish just for yourself is fun too, so I rustled this up just for myself the other day. I felt like the Queen of Holland having this all to myself.

IMG_6872

In the Cooking Price-Wise book Vincent says: ‘If you don’t feel like cooking fish…other foods can be placed between the potato walls – for instance, you can serve all your vegetables beautifully arranged on one large dish, or a mixture of meat and vegetables can be divided by the walls. Anyhow, the important thing is to use your imagination!’

So my second attempt at this dish contained plaice prepared exactly as Vincent recommended, with his lovely creamy sauce, but instead of mushrooms, shrimps, scallops and herring roes, I used up whatever vegetables I had in the fridge. It was utterly delicious! Here’s the recipe to serve 4, but you can divide accordingly if making for less.


Vincent Price’s Fish Fillets Noord Zee
4 medium potatoes
3 tablespoons butter
Small amount of cream
4 fillets of plaice
½ pint / 284ml dry white wine*
Juice of one lemon
1/2-teaspoon salt
1/4-teaspoon white pepper
4 tablespoons butter
4oz / 112g button mushrooms
4oz / 112g shrimps
4oz / 112g herring roes, floured
4oz / 112g scallops

For the sauce
2 eggs
1-tablespoon flour
1/2 / pint / 284ml cream
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Parsley to garnish

Cook potatoes in salted water until very tender. Drain and mash. Beat in butter and enough hot cream to make fluffy potatoes that are still stiff enough to be pressed through a fluted pastry tube. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Keep warm over simmering water.

Poach the plaice in a cup of water, the white wine and lemon juice, with the salt and white pepper added for 5 minutes. Remove the fillets and keep warm. Boil liquid over high heat until reduced to 1/4 pint / 142ml.

Heat 1 tablespoon of butter in each of 4 small frying pans. In one sauté the mushrooms for 5 minutes. In another the shrimps for 5 minutes. In a third, toss the floured herring roes for 5 minutes. In the last, cook the scallops for 5 minutes.

Fill a forcing bag, fitted with a large fluted tube, with the mashed potatoes and press out fluted ribbon down the centre of a large serving platter. On one side press out 3 ribbons from centre to edge of platter, making 4 evenly divided compartments. Arrange the fillets on the other side in the long compartment. Put platter into a warm oven to keep warm.

Sauce
In saucepan beat eggs with flour and cream. Strain the reduced fish liquid into the egg-cream mixture and cook, stirring rapidly until sauce is hot and slightly thickened. Be careful not to let it boil. Stir in 1/2-teaspoon salt, or to taste, and 1 tablespoon lemon juice.

Presentation
Pour sauce over the fish fillets only and garnish with parsley

NB – when converting imperial measurements to metric, there is often a slightly odd result. 112g of each of the dyke fillings are a literal translation, but you can, of course, use more or less as you see fit. Also, for American readers, the Imperial pint is 20% more liquid than an American pint. Probably not crucial in this recipe but something to bear in mind when making the sauce.

Vincent ends the first episode of his brilliant cookery show by shaking some salt over his Vichyssoise and tucking in. He signs off by saying: ‘I hope we meet again, good eating!’ and I say the same. Maybe I’ll do another post sometime, for the Vincent Price London Legacy UK blog. Vincent made Dolmades, Moroccan Tagine and Cafe Napoleon in episode 2, so perhaps I’ll try one of these. In the meantime, I do hope you give Fish Fillets Noord Zee a go. Good eating!

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